Seven ( yes seven! ) remote jobs for you

A great little article  from FastCompany was included in the current Digital Nomad Weekly newsletter and details seven different jobs that are very well suited to remote work. The jobs all require a bit of learning on your part, but none of them require a specific ( or any ) degree, or a set number of years of experience. You can self-learn any of the disciplines ( with some self-discipline ) and start up in your spare time before you make any big leaps.

I’m familiar with all of the seven options they discuss; if you’d like any addition information, feel free to reach out in the comments or by direct message.

Also, I couldn’t help but notice that UX architect ” was not listed, so we’ll just call that job #8.

 

Note – at this moment, I am sitting at a coffeeshop in London, writing this post and doing some work as a Content Entrepreneur, as well as a UX Architect.

2016-08-15 11-13-40 +0100
Today’s office – Maison d’etre, Canonbury, North London

 

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Seven ( yes seven! ) remote jobs for you

  1. I’m going to quibble with the assertion that graphic design doesn’t require a degree… While anyone can learn how to operate Adobe products, that does not make them a designer. I’ve seen so much bad design (and fixed a lot of it) over the years created by homespun designers, it makes my head spin. And, it makes those of us who have went thru the years of training and honing our craft look bad.

    Like

    1. Ha : ) I can say the same thing for UX design. If i have a group of 100 visual designers with relevant degrees in a room with 100 self-taught individuals, all with portfolios, I’ll have much more luck finding someone who can help me among the degreed-pool. Same for UX architects, certainly. But I don’t think that every degreed designer would be more talented or a better fit than every non-degreed designer. Or architect. I definitely don’t mean to diminish the value of a degree, or the skill of the holder. But I’ve definitely had the experience that the holder is not always the “best” choice, and the non-holder is not always the “worst” when the two are compared for talent, fit, availability, hunger, and ease to work with.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s